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Hello and welcome to this web agency Web Designer Newton Upper Falls video tutorial.

I’m Owen Corso from Google.

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And today, we’re going to build a rich media expandable creative with video.

Let’s start by selecting file, New File.

This opens a dialog box where we will set up our ad.

First, let’s make out high of project.

We have four options– The default is Display & Video 360so we will leave that as is.

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Intuit has open-sourced ‘Karate’, a framework that makes the tall claim that the business of testing web-APIs can actually be — fun.

I know what you must be thinking. There’s no way that making HTTP requests and navigating the forest of data that is returned could be fun.

But really, that’s what developers who tried Karate had to say. It actually didn’t surprise us. Because Karate was born out of a strong dis-satisfaction with the current state of solutions that exist. And a lot of thought went into Karate to keep it simple and elegant, to allow the user to focus on the functionality instead of boiler-plate, and to keep things concise.

Karate strives to reduce the entry barrier to writing a test and more importantly — reduces the friction to maintain a test, because of how readable tests become.

The obligatory “Hello World” example may throw some light on the unique approach that Karate takes.

Hello World!

So if you found that compelling, and if you or your teams are in the business of testing complex web-service APIs, be it REST, SOAP, JSON, XML or GraphQL — do check out Karate.

Karate is in the early stages of adoption by teams within Intuit, but we decided to open-source this right away, so as to accelerate the process of community feedback. It is our firm belief that Karate is already equipped to take on the challenge of testing any real-world web-service, and the feature-list on the home page is a testament to this.

And your feedback can make it more awesome. It would be great to see your feature requests on the GitHub project page, and do pass on the link to those who you feel would benefit from what Karate has to offer.

And remember, testing web-services can be fun!

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Next, we can select the type of ad.

We want to make an expandable, so we select Expandable on the left.

Next, we can set again ad’s dimensions.

We are building a 320 by 50that expands to 480 by 250.

So I will make those changes.

We then assign the Newton Upper Falls creative a name.

I will leave my Save ToLocation as the default, and leave the talk about set to Quick.

Once I’m happy with my settings, I click OK.

Google Web Designer creates the initial pages of the ad for me with the dimensions I defined.

 

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The collapsed page already contains a Tap Area event to expand the ad and an expanded pageNewton Upper Falls with a close tap area to collapse back down.

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OWEN CORSO: Hello and welcometo this Google Web Designer video tutorial.

I'm Owen Corso from Google.

And today, we're goingto build a rich media expandable creative with video.

Let's start by selectingFile, New File.

This opens a dialog boxwhere we will set up our ad.

First, let's chooseour environment.

We have four options-- The default is Display & Video 360so we will leave that as is.

Next, we can selectthe type of ad.

We want to make anexpandable, so we select Expandable on the left.

Next, we can set upour ad's dimensions.

We are building a 320 by 50that expands to 480 by 250.

So I will make those changes.

We then assign thecreative a name.

I will leave my Save ToLocation as the default, and leave the animationmode set to Quick.

Once I'm happy with mysettings, I click OK.

Google Web Designer creates theinitial pages of the ad for me with the dimensions I defined.

The collapsed page alreadycontains a Tap Area event to expand the ad and an expandedpage with a close tap area to collapse back down.

It also has added all theinitial code needed for the ad to talk to the ad server andcollect tracking metrics.

Those metrics are builtinto the components, and we can assign uniqueidentifiers to each component as we go.

So now I can start adding thegraphic elements I've already prepared.

I drag a backgroundimage or initial ad state and drop it onto the stage,then align it to the stage, and layer it behind the taparea by sending to back.

Now, let's switch toour expanded page.

Let's add a background imageby dragging my image file to the stage.

I can also add abutton to the stage by dragging theTap Area component.

Let's make a backgroundexit tap area.

I will size, align it, and thenI will give it a unique name.

To add functionalityto the button, I will add an event using theplus button in the event's toolbar.

This brings me tomy Actions panel, where we assignall of the metrics to our ad instead ofcoding them manually.

I'm going to selectthe tap area I just named BackgroundExit from the list.

Choose Tap Area, Touch/Click as the event.

Google Ad, Exit ad.

On the Receiver panel,I select gwd-ad.

Lastly, I give it an exitidentifier and a destination URL.

For more in-depth detailson the event model, check out the Eventsand Metrics video.

Next, let's add avideo component.

You drag it to the stage,then give it a name and size it properly.

Tell it how to behave.

I want it to autoplay and start muted.

And you target thevideo file here.

This component has allof the metrics built in, so you can avoid handcoding them in the ad.

OK.

Let's preview our ad.

On page load, we seeour collapsed state.

When we click, the adexpands to our expanded page.

Our video behavesas we told it to, and clicking on the backgroundexits to our landing page.

Once the ad is built andfunctioning as you want, it is ready to publish.

Go to File, Publish.

And you're presentedwith a few options-- Publish Locally,to Google Drive, and, finally, toStudio.

Let's choose Publish Locally.

This is where you cancontrol how the ad is output.

For instance, youcan add polite load to the ad, which delays thead load until after the page content loads.

You can also set itto minify the code and add browserprefixes automatically.

We'll leave all thesesettings as to the default.

Click Publish, and Web Designerwill wrap up all of your files in a nice little zipfor uploading to Studio.

Now, let's testit out in Studio.

Let's make a newcreative of expanding type.

Drag the zip file to uploadour creative to Studio.

Now, let's preview our creative.

As you can see, I can expandthe unit, play the video, and trigger thebackground exit we added.

You can see these eventslogging to the output console.

And that's an overviewof Studio integration features in Google Web Designer.

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WEB DESIGN IS BROKEN.

It's just crumbled tosand in your hands and it's just disappointing.

Today we are going to talkabout budget that the big one: budget budget BUDGET! It is such a huge topicbut I'm finally gonna lay down the final word on budget, specifically how much youshould spend when you're buying a website.

I've got the answer for you.

Youready you ready for it? 500,000 pounds a week! There we go! Did it!(that was easy) I'm out.

See you later.

(web design isfixed) No.

If you do have five hundred thousand a week to spend on a websiteyou should get in touch with me.

I think we could work with that.

Budget it's sucha huge topic no one's really kind of tackling the answers of a few there's afew articles on the internet that are like "well if you want this type ofwebsite you should spend around this much and if you want that type ofwebsite you should spend around that" Much it really comes down to a fewfactors namely your attitude towards risk, whether you're whether you'recoming from a gain or a pain perspective and how much you actually stand to makeout of it.

What you're really doing is investing in a website: you're lookingfor it to create a return you want it to be putting money back into your pocket.

If you don't want it to do that then it's only gonna be acting detrimental,it's only gonna be taking money or reputation or whatever out of yourpocket and you really need to rethink the reasons why you're doing this in thefirst place.

Go back to one of my previous videos wherewhat where I ask you the question why are you doing this in the first place.

Sothe first thing that we've got to understand when we're asking thequestion how much does a website cost, how much do I spend on a website, we'vereally got to appreciate that all you're doing is you'retrying to give yourself what they call an 'anchor' This is literally just apsychological stake in the ground so that your brain can go "okay well I'vegot a point to start from" It really doesn't matter what that number is butit becomes your anchor: the first price you hear becomes your anchor and aroundthat point you will base all value judgments.

So be careful when you'reasking this question because you might end up with another massivelyoverinflated number that completely puts you off of even going down that routewhen actually you could have got something that worked for you at areasonable price, and if you get a number that's too lowyou're gonna look around and think "hey well this is all way too expensive" andnot actually start engaging in the conversations to help you understand thevalue that it could bring there is.

Another thing that you need to be reallyaware of when you're trying to create a budget for our website and that is thatyou like me like everyone else on the planetwe are naturally risk-averse: yeah we have loss aversion.

Most people agree withthe statement that "it is better to not lose five pounds than it is to find fivepounds" It's the same five pounds! It's weirdwe're hardwired to avoid losses.

We try and keep what we have and thereforewe're less likely to risk that in search of future gains so this means thatyou're naturally going to be skeptical about the gains that you can create witha website you're naturally gonna want to spend as little as possible andthat means that you're at a risk of actually under investing when you'rebuying a website Yourisk of under-investing because you're averse to loss.

I'm exactly the same: theamount of times that I've bought things that I need on say Amazon and gone forthe cheapest possible one because I wasn't entirely sure if, you know, if itwould bring me the thing that I was looking for - the reality is that I endup spending double because, you know, buy cheap buy twice.

But you can actuallyunder invest and if you do especially in something like a website it's like underinvesting in in your team member: if you if you hire a new salesman andyou under invest in him well then he's not gonna do as good a job as hepossibly could do if you're picking if you're picking your teammembers based on the salary that they're willing to accept then you're probablyunder investing and you're not actually realizing that if you spend a little bitmore you can get like disproportionately larger returns.

The third thing that youreally need to be aware of but before you start thinking about your budget iswhether you're coming from a pain perspective or a gain perspective.

Areyou looking to this website to help you reach new markets to help you, I don'tknow, dominate the competition; to help you boost sales/Is it a gain thing? Are you launching a new business a new product? Or are youlooking at it from a pain perspective? Are you looking at it and thinking wellhow can I use this website to help me automate things, cut costs, reduceoverhead - things like that.

Maybe you've got a whole bunch of bad reviews on yourexisting website and so you're almost being forced by your customers forced byyour marketplace to up your game what you're really trying to do there ismanage losses.

You approach these.

you can buy the same thing in two different waysand your experience and therefore what you're willing to spend completelychanges depending on whether you're coming from a pain or a gain perspective.

The final line on it is using an analogy that we use sometimesit's based around cars basically.

Are you are you just trying toget to and from work or are you trying to win Formula One the Formula One GrandPrix you need very different types of cars to be able to do each of thosethings.

There's no point in buying a Formula One car because when you pull upin the Sainsbury's car park you're gonna have nowhere to put your shopping.

Likewise there's no point in buying a Fiat Panda and taking it to the track.

Sothe better you can understand what type of race is that your business is tryingto win, or what type of things your business are trying to do with a websiteand what that's worth to you is the better you're gonna be able to startcreating a realistic budget and get a return that's more in line with yourexpectations.

My name is Aaron Taylor I'm helping youto make better decisions and have better conversations when you're buying awebsite.

till next time.

[singing] I fixed webdesign, said I fixed web design.

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WEB DESIGN IS BROKEN but it's okay weare fixing it.

Today we are gonna follow on from the last video and we're gonnatake you further along down that path to that magical place called budget.

Yeswe're helping you to create a budget, an appropriate budget for your web designproject.

I'm still not gonna give you some magical figure because it doesn'texist; it's all relative.

So I'm not gonna talkin terms of X pounds or Y dollars but I will be talking in terms of high mediumlow investment what that means only you can really know because a largeinvestment for you might be a small investment for the next business: a smallinvestment for coca-cola it's probably gonna be most people's annual turnovers!So only you will know what a large versus a small investment actually is.

Soin the last video we laid down some key things that you really need to be awareof when you're thinking about a budget not just for a web design project butactually for anything and these are these are things, biases that that we allhave as people that can really affect how we determine what to invest inthings.

By understanding these biases we actually reduce the chance of over orunder investing in a project just simply by being aware of them.

So in this videowe're gonna look at two more very key things that are going to give you quitea reliable shortcut to determining whether the investment you make islarger or smaller.

These two things are risk and complexity.

What do we mean byrisk and what do we mean by complexity? When we're talking about risk we'retalking about the impact that it could have on your business.

Something that ishigh risk could have a significant impact on your business.

The way I like to think about risk is that it's whether it goes right orwhether it goes wrong, so it's not just down side there's also upside as well.

If there's significant upside then it's still gonna be high risk.

Low risk meansthat it's not gonna make a huge impact on your business,it's not gonna move the needle as they say.

Complexity is really just about howtechnically difficult it is to actually deliver this piece of functionality soif you look at, I don't know, take bridge making as an example: if you're buildinga small bridge across a little stream then that's probably going to be lesstechnically difficult then if you're trying to bridge the River Thames.

So it'show technically difficult it is to deliver and again it goes on a scale oflow to high complexity so why risk and complexity well if we plot them on agraph like so, we can see that they create four quadrants.

Now each of thesefour quadrants represents a different type of project: a high risk, highcomplexity project; a high risk, low complexity project; a low risk, highcomplexity project and a low risk, low complexity project.

Now just by exploringthese four different types of projects, these four project characteristics wecan actually start to make assumptions about what that project is going to belike and give you some shortcuts as to how much you invest in that type ofproject.

Let's jump into it: let's start off with the easy one low risk lowcomplexity.

So this is what I call the 'tick box' this is a website project thatis effectively just a tick box exercise maybe as a part of your business there'sa requirement that you have a web-based resource which goes over a whole bunchof really interesting things.

Maybe it'sjust a regulatory requirement, maybe you've gone for some funding and awebsite has to be a part of what you deliver.

It really doesn't make a hugeimpact on your business if it's just informational as these things typicallytend to be, then it doesn't really require groundbreaking programmingskills and cutting-edge design to actually fulfill its need.

So in thistype of project you really want to be investing as little as you possibly canjust as much as you need to to get a reasonable job done.

It's not gonna makea huge impact on your business; it's not technically difficult to deliver youjust want something that works and that ticks that box.

So if your project is lowrisk low complexity don't bet the farm on it there's no point it's not gonnabring you the return that you need pay as little as you can to get a goodprofessional job done but don't go crazy over it.

So now we've got low risk highcomplexity.

This is an interesting space and I like to call this quadrant in thistype of project the 'moderniser'.

With something that's low risk and highcomplexity typically we're looking at improving existing systems and processesusing newly available modern technologies.

With this type of projectwhat you really want to be doing is looking at a provider that hasthoroughly solved this problem so I'm thinking online payments companies likePayPal, like Stripe have thoroughly solved this technical challenge.

It's notnecessarily the type of project that you think is going to completelyrevolutionize your business; it might make things a lot more efficient andyou'll probably see some uptick in sales, engagement things like that, but ultimatelyit's not the big game changer for your business.

So you should be lookingto invest a reasonable amount to get some off-the-shelf solutions that canactually bridge this gap and help you modernize.

Let's jump into my favoritequadrant: low complexity high risk this is what I call the 'punt'.

So this is myfavorite sector because this is typically where a business has spotted anew opportunity maybe a new part of the market maybe they want to spin off anexisting product or service and they just want to test it out.

They want tosee whether their offering or messaging works.

Why this is high risk is that ifit works well then there could be significant upside.

It might be a wholenew part of their business it might be a new standalone business if it goes badlythen they lose their initial investment.

Now what you want to do when you'reworking in this quadrant you what you want to be doing is thinking aboutmultiple small investments and testing religiously.

Test absolutely everythingbecause what you're trying to do is figure out if this thing, if this ideahas got the legs to warrant a proper investment.

You want to be thinkinglanding pages; very simple to produce very easy to iterate.

You also want to bethinking about investing in things like pay-per-click advertising as well -literally buying the traffic to test against your multiple service offeringvariations.

Don't bet the farm on this it's all about controlling risk at everysingle point every single iteration so be very purposeful be very deliberateabout how you execute when you're dealing with low complexity high riskprojects.

So the final quadrant is what I call the 'moonshot'.

This is the stuff ofstartup legend.

This is that entrepreneur space where we are launching newproducts into unknown markets.

This is an area that is very similar to high risklow complexity in its approach but you should really be making significantinvestments in this area: you still need to control the risk andyou still need to test fastidiously but you might be needing to actually investheavier and produce some custom functionality.

You might need to actuallybe producing working prototypes of your product or service offering.

You can't cut corners when you're in this quadrant the risk is too high.

Because the complexity is high you're probably going to be building thingsthat have never been built before; you're needing to create technical capabilitywithin your business and understand how that impacts the delivery of yourproduct and/or service.

So absolutely never cut corners here.

The key wordsthat you should be listening out to when you're talking about the project is 'noone else is doing this', 'this has never been done before', 'this is brand new',''here's why it's different to the competitors'.

All of these things shouldbe getting you thinking high risk high complexity.

Invest well, don't cut cornersand test and iterate and measure absolutely everything you can.

So thoseare the four quadrants and hopefully this gets you a little bit closer tounderstanding where your project sits in those quadrants and the amount that youshould invest relative to, well whatever that means to you as a business.

Thus farwe've understood things about the biases and the psychology that can affect howwe make investment decisions, we've been able to identify where our project sitsalong an axis of risk versus complexity in the next video we're going to belooking at some pounds and pence examples for how you can start to createthat budget or a range of that budget based on the perceived upside or theperceived savings that you're gonna make or thatyou're hoping to make in your web design project.

That was heavy!My name is Aaron Taylor, I'm helping you to make better decisions and have betterconversations when you're buying a website.

Till next time!.