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Hello and welcome to this website design Web Designer West Roxbury video tutorial.

I’m Owen Corso from Google.

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And today, we’re going to build a rich media expandable creative with video.

Let’s start by selecting file, New File.

This opens a dialog box where we will set up our ad.

First, let’s make out high of project.

We have four options– The default is Display & Video 360so we will leave that as is.

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CHRIS: Welcome! My name is Chris and I'm a designer on the Google Web Designer team Today I'll walk through a new dynamictemplate with an emphasis on text We'll cover customizations includingconfigurable panels selecting nested elements, dynamic text fitting, editing groups and a demonstration of the template when uploaded into Display &Video 360 Ad Canvas Let's get started First let's navigate to the templatelibrary You'll find the template under the thumbnail Data Driven for Display & Video 360 Notice we have three new template layouts to choose from Blank Slate, Cue Cards and Panorama but today we'll be focusing on cue cards Let's create a template using cue cards I'm going to give the file a quick name andclick Create Now before we proceed in Google Web Designer let's take a quicklook at a design schematic of cue cards So cue cards is a template that utilizeselements and assets such as a logo, a background image, a swipe gallery a swipe gallery navigation, an animated arrow icon and three dynamic text groupslabelled SlideA through SlideC You also notice a few tap areas utilized for dynamic exits OK jumping back into Google Web Designer Let's review a fewimportant panels for customizing and configuring cue cards the template In the timeline you'll notice we have a lock icon Let's click the lock icon to unlock and edit the layer Let's select componentswipe-vertical Next navigate to the Properties panel The Properties panel iswhere we can configure the elements attributes style, position and size, andalso edit the component properties You'll find this component is driventhrough the use of groups SlideA, SlideB, and SlideC Now let's move to the Library panel We'll find the individual group definitions and group contents in the Library We can right click a group nameclick Edit and edit the contents of the group Protip: to quickly inspect theelements inside this group We'll use the Outliner The Outliner is a really coolnew tool for enabling us to view nested elements inside the group versus clicking through your divisions you can rapidly find which element you would like to target and edit You'll also notice in this creative we have twodivisions: wrap-SlideA txt-wrap-SlideA These are dynamic text divisions thathave a little bit of CSS logic that helped to auto center them depending upon what type of information comes down through the feed Now let's click on txt-description-SlideA in the Outliner You'll also notice there's a T icon next tothe txt-description-SlideA This signifies that it's a text element With the text element selected We will come up to the panel at the top named Text In the text panel you'll be able to configure text fitting of dynamic text and also the styling of the text in your document We can set a maximum size andalso a minimum size and when the dynamic text is passed to the division it will display the rendered fitted text size Now let's navigate back to the root ofthe document you'll notice we have breadcrumbs in the bottom left-hand corner of the stage right above the timeline Let's click Div to jump back tothe root of our document Now two more notable panels are the Events panel and the Dynamic panel In the Events panels we have events thatare specific to the control over the animated arrow icons behavior during autoplay and also during user gesture Next to the Events panel we have theDynamic tab These are the dynamic bindings that enable this document to bebound dynamically including assets, text, styling, and click exits You'll also notice Brand Awareness ishighlighted Brand Awareness is the schema we are going to be utilizing inside of Display & Video 360 Ad Canvas click OK to exit the dialog As an added bonus I would like to demonstrate the power of this creative If I jump over to a mock from a visual designer this is technically the specthe designer would like me to build to This creative is dynamic so the textcould technically be interchanged Let's fast forward to what the creative canlook like if I built it using Google Web Designers Cue Cards template You'll notice as I refresh this page the creative auto animates The arrow tries to grab the users' attention by animating and jumping The creative also has anavigation on the right hand side where we can drive the creative Users can also use gesture to scroll through the creative upon user interaction Let's say I wanted to publish this creative and upload it into Display & Video 360Ad Canvas So you might have a question what is the Ad canvas The Ad Canvas isa visual editor you can use to build and edit creatives in real time The Ad Canvas only supports our Google Web Designer data driven templates and also custom variations So in DV360 my template is loaded in the center and on the right hand side I have a UI that is editable on-the-fly You'll notice textfitting is working Variations and iterations can be knockedout proofed and signed off in a matter of minutes now with Google Web Designer'snew data driven templates in the Ad Canvas The new dynamic workflow hasnever been easier if you would like to learn more about Ad Canvas please look in the details section of this video for a Display & Video 360 Ad Canvascomprehensive demonstration link This wraps up our video Please have funcreating new dynamic ads Thank you from the team at Google Web Designer.

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Next, we can select the type of ad.

We want to make an expandable, so we select Expandable on the left.

Next, we can set again ad’s dimensions.

We are building a 320 by 50that expands to 480 by 250.

So I will make those changes.

We then assign the West Roxbury creative a name.

I will leave my Save ToLocation as the default, and leave the talk about set to Quick.

Once I’m happy with my settings, I click OK.

Google Web Designer creates the initial pages of the ad for me with the dimensions I defined.

 

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The collapsed page already contains a Tap Area event to expand the ad and an expanded pageWest Roxbury with a close tap area to collapse back down.

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OWEN CORSO: Hello and welcometo this Google Web Designer video tutorial.

I'm Owen Corso from Google.

And today, we're goingto build a rich media expandable creative with video.

Let's start by selectingFile, New File.

This opens a dialog boxwhere we will set up our ad.

First, let's chooseour environment.

We have four options-- The default is Display & Video 360so we will leave that as is.

Next, we can selectthe type of ad.

We want to make anexpandable, so we select Expandable on the left.

Next, we can set upour ad's dimensions.

We are building a 320 by 50that expands to 480 by 250.

So I will make those changes.

We then assign thecreative a name.

I will leave my Save ToLocation as the default, and leave the animationmode set to Quick.

Once I'm happy with mysettings, I click OK.

Google Web Designer creates theinitial pages of the ad for me with the dimensions I defined.

The collapsed page alreadycontains a Tap Area event to expand the ad and an expandedpage with a close tap area to collapse back down.

It also has added all theinitial code needed for the ad to talk to the ad server andcollect tracking metrics.

Those metrics are builtinto the components, and we can assign uniqueidentifiers to each component as we go.

So now I can start adding thegraphic elements I've already prepared.

I drag a backgroundimage or initial ad state and drop it onto the stage,then align it to the stage, and layer it behind the taparea by sending to back.

Now, let's switch toour expanded page.

Let's add a background imageby dragging my image file to the stage.

I can also add abutton to the stage by dragging theTap Area component.

Let's make a backgroundexit tap area.

I will size, align it, and thenI will give it a unique name.

To add functionalityto the button, I will add an event using theplus button in the event's toolbar.

This brings me tomy Actions panel, where we assignall of the metrics to our ad instead ofcoding them manually.

I'm going to selectthe tap area I just named BackgroundExit from the list.

Choose Tap Area, Touch/Click as the event.

Google Ad, Exit ad.

On the Receiver panel,I select gwd-ad.

Lastly, I give it an exitidentifier and a destination URL.

For more in-depth detailson the event model, check out the Eventsand Metrics video.

Next, let's add avideo component.

You drag it to the stage,then give it a name and size it properly.

Tell it how to behave.

I want it to autoplay and start muted.

And you target thevideo file here.

This component has allof the metrics built in, so you can avoid handcoding them in the ad.

OK.

Let's preview our ad.

On page load, we seeour collapsed state.

When we click, the adexpands to our expanded page.

Our video behavesas we told it to, and clicking on the backgroundexits to our landing page.

Once the ad is built andfunctioning as you want, it is ready to publish.

Go to File, Publish.

And you're presentedwith a few options-- Publish Locally,to Google Drive, and, finally, toStudio.

Let's choose Publish Locally.

This is where you cancontrol how the ad is output.

For instance, youcan add polite load to the ad, which delays thead load until after the page content loads.

You can also set itto minify the code and add browserprefixes automatically.

We'll leave all thesesettings as to the default.

Click Publish, and Web Designerwill wrap up all of your files in a nice little zipfor uploading to Studio.

Now, let's testit out in Studio.

Let's make a newcreative of expanding type.

Drag the zip file to uploadour creative to Studio.

Now, let's preview our creative.

As you can see, I can expandthe unit, play the video, and trigger thebackground exit we added.

You can see these eventslogging to the output console.

And that's an overviewof Studio integration features in Google Web Designer.

Data Driven Templates for Display & Video 360 Ad Canvas - Google Web Designer

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ADRIENNE PORTERFELT: You've probably tried to buy somethingonline or had to fill out some formfor your kid's school, and it's reallyhard on your phone.

It's really hard.

MUSTAFA: There seemsto be a dark art when it comes to nativeapplications, and they're such small details thatyou're actually working on.

[MUSIC PLAYING] Quite often, developers willjust throw on input fields onto a page and not reallythink about the UX that's attributed to that.

So they'll think ofa flow of a form, but they won't necessarilyfeel that individual input, so how a user struggles.

And we know thatautocomplete really helps speed up theuser experience and makes fillingforms quite nice.

What are your feelingsand experiences on autocomplete andAutofill as a thing? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT:From the user experience, you've probably triedto buy something online or had to fill out someform for your kid's school.

And it's reallyhard on your phone.

It's really hard.

It's even hard on desktop.

You don't want to get upand get your credit card out of your purse,which is downstairs.

And these browserfeatures just really improve the userexperience of using a form.

In fact, we find that peoplefill out or submit the form 30% faster if the formworks with Autofill.

So we very much suggest thatweb developers think about this.

You want people to besubmitting your forms.

Right? So if you really want yourforms to be submitted quickly, easily, work with Autofill.

MUSTAFA: And why do you thinkdevelopers don't do that? Is it very difficult to do? I'm assuming it's just a fewattributes you add to inputs.

Right? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Yeah.

It's actually not that hard.

So you basically need to setup autocomplete attributes, and you need to makesure that you're not doing any fancy things thatreplace the normal select and input elements withother types of elements.

I think most of these developersjust don't think about it, don't realize,that you just need to put a littlebit of extra effort in to make sure that yourform works well with Autofill and to test it out.

MUSTAFA: Is that oneof the challenges, I suppose, like people makingthese custom UI things, which are not native but justlike divs or whatever and replacing that? Is that where thingsfall down with Autofill? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT:Honestly, there's a few things that can go wrong,but that's one of the big ones.

Yeah, so someone wants thisreally beautiful custom form where the dropdown isall fancy and custom.

And as a result of that,they're using all divs.

And the browser can'tfigure out, oh, this is supposed to be a form.

And then in that case,Autofill isn't going to work.

MUSTAFA: And Isuppose there's a lot of accessibilityissues connected to that as well, it looks like.

But from your pointof view, you've got designers anddevelopers, they want to do something custom,like unique experience.

But then as someone whoworks on the browser, you want to say, now letthe browser do the work.

Do you think there'sa middle point there? How can developers at leasthave a custom experience that's unique to theirproduct, but at the same time without breaking standards? Because this is one of thebiggest challenges on the web.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT:So there's a lot of things you can do tochange the look of the form on the page while stillusing the select and input elements that HTML provides.

Right? You can customizethem in many ways.

I have to admit, there is onething you can't customize, and it's the lookof the dropdown, like in a select element.

But everything else, the wayit statically looks on a page, you can customize.

And the browser will stillknow that they're fields.

MUSTAFA: Yeah.

What you see is thebiggest challenge then, for Autofillor implementation, from your point of view? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT:I think it's honestly that developers don't thinkabout it, that people don't think to themselves that theyreally need to be testing their forms in this way.

When you've made it yourself,you've filled it out 100 times.

You tested it yourself.

And you don't thinkabout the fact that a user is goingto be coming to it in a different state of mind.

They're tired.

They are tryingto fill it out as fast as they can on the phone.

So I think developersjust aren't really thinking about the factthat they need to take these extra small steps.

MUSTAFA: So in terms ofbrowser compatibility, the things you're using willbe Chrome-specific stuff? Or is that open source-- not open source, butit's cross-platform.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Yeah,that's a good question.

So specifically autocompleteattributes for Autofill, that's standardized.

All the browsers respect them.

With that being said, thereis one part, turning Autofill off-- that's the autocompleteoff attribute-- is not respected by all browsers.

But if you say,this form should be a credit card, thatwill be respected by all the major browsers.

MUSTAFA: But eachexperience, is there slight quirks per browser? Because obviously, that's goingto be a browser-specific thing.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Some are-- they have veryslightly different UIs.

For example, maybe they'llbe integrated with a keyboard widget versus a dropdown.

But I think they're prettysimilar across browsers.

MUSTAFA: You work on theactual Chrome UI itself.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Yes.

MUSTAFA: So are you actuallybuilding that design and code yourself, or are youworking with UX designers in that process? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Sowe have a design team.

And the design team helpsus figure out what those UI elements should look like.

We actually have a bigredesign coming up this year that I think is going tomake those substantially more beautiful and also help clean upthe code, which I know that it won't affect most people becauseit won't look any different.

But from our perspective-- MUSTAFA: It's much cleaner.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Man,the code's so much cleaner.

MUSTAFA: What's the actualprocess of you actually creating UI? Because for me, I do front-enddevelopment and code.

But it's like there seemsto be a dark art when it comes to native applications.

And they're such smalldetails that you're actually working on, which the user maynot notice because it works.

But if it's broken,they will see it.

What is the actualprocess that you go through with your Chromedesigners to actually making the UI or testing it? I'm asking lots ofquestions all at once.

ADRIENNE PORTERFELT: Yeah, it's OK.

It's OK.

So I'll talk about theprocess a little bit.

So usually at the beginning,Product, Eng, and the designer will get togetherand talk about what they hope for from the feature.

Often, the designwill then come up with some conceptualmocks of what they feel the feature could look like.

They'll get feedbackfrom Product.

They'll get feedback fromthe engineers, like can we actually build this, whatare the corner cases we need? And then we'lliteratively get closer to what we actually can ship.

So I work on across-platform team, which means that whatwe build has to ship on all of Chrome's platforms.

People think of Chromeas one platform.

But actually, it'sWindows and Mac-- which previouslyhad different UIs, but we're coming toone single standard-- Android, iOS.

And so we have to havedifferent mocks that relate to the specific platforms.

So some things may bepossible for some subset.

Anyway, the designers get allthis feedback from engineers, like, we can do thishere and not there.

And then we iterativelycome through to red lines, which isour final set of designs.

And that's what we implement.

MUSTAFA: So in termsof do the designers work with the actual W3C? Because you'redesigning something which has to beconsidered cross-platform at the same [? time.

?] So likewhen the payment request API, like I was working withsome of the team there, there seems to be thingswhere you have to really be seeing whateveryone else is doing so that the experiencethat you're creating is not so widely different.

And that can be quitechallenging for the designer and developer because youinstinctively want to make it, I don't know, "better.

" But you don't want to makeit so vastly different, because then you stick out.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: That'san interesting question.

The challenge here isthat with specs, we try not to specify whatthe UI has to look like.

We try to talk about what theuser experience should be so that we can have the appropriatecallbacks, et cetera, to build that experience.

But we don't like tostandardize the UI itself, which is a fine balance becauseyou have to have a UI in mind when you're designing the API.

But we try to make itas general as possible so that we can build differentUI experiences on top of it.

MUSTAFA: Are you workingwith the browsers as well at the sametime to do that, or is it you do things independently? Because there's the thing.

It's like if you do it[INAUDIBLE] the browsers, then you may be leddown a path that's not the best for everyone.

That it's, OK, it'slike a compromise.

But at the same time, you don'twant that complete disparity.

ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Itdepends a lot on the standard, honestly.

Some of them willbe heavily driven by Chrome or some other browser.

They really want this API.

They'll drive it, and thenget a little bit of feedback along the way fromother vendors.

Whereas others,from the beginning, there's severaldifferent browser vendors working together.

So honestly, it differsfrom standard to standard.

MUSTAFA: And we're coming to the10-year anniversary of Chrome.

What do you thinkthe future of say, Autofill, or just workingwith the other browsers? Because it seems like thingsare getting much better.

I was speaking toDarren, and it was like, the implementationof Flexbox was a nightmare becausethe standard kept changing.

But with CSS grid, it'samazing that there's so much cross-collaborationbetween the browsers, which is great for the users and thedevelopers working across this.

What do you think the futureis for Chrome as a platform and, I suppose, Autofillas well as a specific? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Sofor Autofill specifically, it's hard to saybecause I don't think the limitation there reallyis the lack of browser vendors cooperating.

I feel like actually, there'sbeen a lot of discussion, for example, aroundpayment request.

There's a lot of collaborationbetween Safari and Chrome.

I think that thereal problem we have is that Autofill dependson developer adoption.

Right? If it's hard for thebrowser to figure out what form's in thepage, we're not going to be able to Autofill it.

And so I think thething we really care about is whetherwe can get developers interested in andusing the tools that we have provided for them totry to improve the Autofill experience.

MUSTAFA: Yeah.

Do you ever have toremove a feature when you see there's not wide adoption? Because I can seefrom an engineer, you're working on Chrome.

You spent your heart andsoul working on this feature.

And then you know it'sgreat for user experience.

You know from theresearch that Autofill will help transactions,and it's just nicer.

But if adoption doesn'thappen, how do you [INAUDIBLE]?? It's the biggest-- ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Yeah,that's a really hard one.

I've been througha few deprecations.

They can be really challenging.

It's very hard.

So there are a few waysyou can look at it.

One is how many usersinteract with websites that are using such a feature.

And obviously, thatnumber is large, you don't want to create apain point for a lot of users.

But even if thenumber is very small, it might be that there are afew websites, a few companies, whose entire businessmodel depends on having access to this API.

And so that can make itvery difficult, where OK, even if it's thisreally a niche thing, it still can behard to deprecate.

So I think there have beenlots of ongoing discussions in general about howto make that trade-off.

Some of the onesI've been involved in relate specificallyto security and TLS, where if something is makingthe web as a whole as safe, we may have to breaksome connections in order to deprecate it.

And it can be areally painful thing when you've got old serverson the internet that aren't being upgraded.

And maybe it's only a smallpercentage of overall page loads, but it'sstill frustrating when a user is trying to getto a website and it's broken.

MUSTAFA: Yeah.

But ultimately, fromChrome's perspective, it's the user's experiencethat's paramount.

Right? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Yes.

MUSTAFA: And theirsafety and security.

So it's like HTTPS, you couldprobably explain it better, but there's a cutoff pointwhere if your site is not loaded on HTTPS, you're goingto get a message saying, this isn't secure.

That's true.

Right? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Fora long time in Chrome, we showed HTTP as neutral, HTTPas just plain text and no TLS.

MUSTAFA: Sorry, what's TLS,just for my non-designer-- ADRIENNE PORTER FELT: Oh, TLSis the underlying protocol that makes HTTPS HTTPS.

It's why it's secure.

So there is HTTP,which doesn't have any of the end-to-endsecurity bits on it.

And HTTP websiteswere just shown as a neutral standard thing.

Right? Most websites on the web wereHTTP, but that's changed.

We went from a few yearsago, we were at 25% HTTPS.

And now, it's the opposite wherewe're at more like 75% HTTPS.

So made changes in theUI to back that up.

So now when you go to awebsite that says HTTP, it's going to also say"not secure" next to it so people reallyunderstand what that means.

MUSTAFA: That decision mustbe quite tough, though.

In some respects, you need toforce the developers to say users' security is paramount.

But at the sametime, does it feel like you're breaking the web? ADRIENNE PORTER FELT:It doesn't really feel like we'rebreaking the web.

First of all, Ithink people have seen this a long time coming.

We've been talking aboutit for a long time.

We've rolled it out in phases.

So first, we started showing"not secure" specifically for pages with passwordsand credit card form fields.

And then it was for allform fields and web pages when viewed in incognito.

And now we're rolling itout for all HTTP websites.

And as you can see, becauseHTTPS adoption has really increased, it's onlyimpacting less than a quarter of page loads at this point.

MUSTAFA: So really,we're just talking about protecting the user.

ADRIENNE PORTERFELT: Yeah, and I think users have a right to knowthat their information isn't secure when they'regoing to this website and help them make adecision about whether or not they want to keep using thatservice or go to another one.

MUSTAFA: And do youthink users are quite savvy now to see those things? Or is this part of theeducation for the user as well to say, look,there are certain things on the web which arenot secure that you have to take into consideration.

ADRIENNE PORTERFELT: I'll be honest.

We have literally billions ofactive users, so it's hard to-- MUSTAFA: Make ageneral [INAUDIBLE] ADRIENNE PORTERFELT: --say generally whether people are goingto understand it or not.

We think enoughpeople understand it that they have a reactionand that they can reach out to sites saying, hey, Ireally like this site, but I wish it were secure.

And we see people doing thatas we've been rolling out these warnings.

SPEAKER 1: The way thatcellular networks are set up is that there's alwaysthese fringe areas, and there's alwaysthese breakdowns.

And higher latencyis always there.